It’s good for business when kids – and adults – can jump for joy, but trampoline parks also find it crucial to keep guests safe as well as having fun at trampoline parks. For this article, park managers offered their tips for safety and staff training.
At Sky High Sports in Los Angeles, Calif., Manager Will Shannon said the best way to keep guests safe as they enjoy jumping fun, is to provide adequate safety monitors. “At every course we have signage up, and all around the building as well to remind people of safety; we have instructional videos for our guests to watch on proper bouncing techniques, as well. But the most important thing of all is to place our safety monitoring staff at every course where customers are jumping.” He added, “We also have placed safety pads around the trampolines.” The facility employs one safety monitor per court with the exception of the main court, which is their biggest jumping area. There they position two employees. “These are the right numbers for us, the right sets of eyes in each location. For the most part, our areas are pretty contained and easy to watch; the main area is just too much for one person to cover comfortably however, which is why we have two people there at all times,” Shannon noted.


As for as training their safety monitors goes, Shannon related, “Hands on training is always the best. We have meetings once a month where we provide training. And, when any employee is first hired, their first shift is a training shift at the very busiest time of the day and in the evening. You get trained hands-on by the manager on duty. Those refreshers keep people sharp and it helps anyone who isn’t getting the hang of things at first.”
According to Shannon, who has worked at the facility for nine years, the last couple of years have been on a bit of downswing with flat growth in attendance. The reason? “It’s really because we have so much competition in our area; there are lots of choices for family entertainment dollars. There are a lot of new jump facilities all around us, too; the mall near us opened a giant playground-type jungle gym, as well. So, we get a lot more competition than we used to.”
Ryan Means, owner of Air Borne Sports in Draper, Utah, said., “Safety is our number one priority, and a fun, memorable experience is number two. We have an educational video that we ask people to watch when they first arrive, we have rules posted throughout the facility, and our monitors are stationed throughout the jumping area looking for any issues.” He added, “We try to have a monitor for every 20-50 participants.” To train the guards, he related, “In addition to all the customer service training, conflict resolution role playing and attraction-specific monitor trainings that we provide, all of our managers are CPR and first aid certified. We also have an AED in the facility which our managers are trained to use.” Attendance is up this year at Air Borne Sports. “We are still a relatively new facility, so people are still learning about us,” he noted, citing birthday parties, team banquets, corporate events, and customer appreciation parties as growing areas.

“At every course we have signage up, and all around the building as well to remind people of safety; we have instructional videos for our guests to watch on proper bouncing techniques, as well. But the most important thing of all is to place our safety monitoring staff at every course where customers are jumping.” -Will Shannon, Sky High Sports, Los Angeles, Calif.


At Sky Zone in Chula Vista, Calif., General Manager Kirian Nito related that at his facility “We have court monitors at all courts and safety videos running throughout the entire park,” to ensure safety. As to monitors “It depends on the day as to how many monitors we have working, but we always have at least one person guarding each court. If things are busy, we double up and have two monitors on each court. That’s just a good number for us to have so that we can keep an eye on everyone. We always have one per 20 jumpers, so we have more court monitors on the weekends.”
Nito trains guards successfully through an onboarding period of two weeks. “There’s in-person training and video online training; we do classroom training and on the floor as well. We are very thorough because the safety of our jumpers is important to us.” He explained that attendance is trending up, and the reason is the implementation of facility memberships. “We just launched memberships and people are buying a lot of them. That brings in many repeat customers for us.”
In Vancouver, Wash., William Rushford, assistant manager at JJ Jump, said, “Both padding and monitoring are key when it comes to keeping guests safe while they have fun jumping. Typically, we have one employee monitoring our room. We have six jump areas all located in one area of our facility.” Rushford added that parents are also required to stay and watch their children while they jump. The small facility additionally includes a play area for younger children that is separate from the jumping area. To train monitors and all staff members Rushford said the facility does “one-on-one personal training which is really the best for us, because we are right here and we can observe how a new staff member is doing, and we can assist. We’re not a massive organization with lots of people.” He noted that the facility has been open 10 years, and that attendance has stayed consistent overall, it has gone up since the end of the summer. “Fall is always the high season for attendance,” he stated, “and we seem to be doing well this year. We have good word of mouth.”
At Fly High Trampoline Park Reno, Manager Sonya Skinner asserted that the best way to keep guests safe while jumping is “Training, training, training. That means training the customer and the employee both about safe jumping. It’s also important to keep everything in top shape. People are hard on the equipment, so it’s very important to make sure things are in good shape, be vigilant, and do constant repairs. We have 30 monitors watching at one time. Our facility is 28,000-square-feet, we have close to 20 trampolines. Having a total of 30 monitors means we have a number that works well for us because we can watch everything closely.” She said there are always eyes on every jumper. As to training, “We use a combination of video training and one-on-one training. We shadow our employees during personal training.” Attendance at Fly High is up. “It’s due to advertising, word of mouth, and simply the fact that more people are getting to know about us. Winter is the best season for us, and our numbers increase seasonally as well.”

At Sky Zone in Chula Vista, Calif., General Manager Kirian Nito related that at his facility “We have court monitors at all courts and safety videos running throughout the entire park,” to ensure safety. As to monitors “It depends on the day as to how many monitors we have working, but we always have at least one person guarding each court. If things are busy, we double up and have two monitors on each court. That’s just a good number for us to have so that we can keep an eye on everyone. We always have one per 20 jumpers, so we have more court monitors on the weekends.”
Nito trains guards successfully through an onboarding period of two weeks. “There’s in-person training and video online training; we do classroom training and on the floor as well. We are very thorough because the safety of our jumpers is important to us.” He explained that attendance is trending up, and the reason is the implementation of facility memberships. “We just launched memberships and people are buying a lot of them. That brings in many repeat customers for us.”
In Vancouver, Wash., William Rushford, assistant manager at JJ Jump, said, “Both padding and monitoring are key when it comes to keeping guests safe while they have fun jumping. Typically, we have one employee monitoring our room. We have six jump areas all located in one area of our facility.” Rushford added that parents are also required to stay and watch their children while they jump. The small facility additionally includes a play area for younger children that is separate from the jumping area. To train monitors and all staff members Rushford said the facility does “one-on-one personal training which is really the best for us, because we are right here and we can observe how a new staff member is doing, and we can assist. We’re not a massive organization with lots of people.” He noted that the facility has been open 10 years, and that attendance has stayed consistent overall, it has gone up since the end of the summer. “Fall is always the high season for attendance,” he stated, “and we seem to be doing well this year. We have good word of mouth.”
At Fly High Trampoline Park Reno, Manager Sonya Skinner asserted that the best way to keep guests safe while jumping is “Training, training, training. That means training the customer and the employee both about safe jumping. It’s also important to keep everything in top shape. People are hard on the equipment, so it’s very important to make sure things are in good shape, be vigilant, and do constant repairs. We have 30 monitors watching at one time. Our facility is 28,000-square-feet, we have close to 20 trampolines. Having a total of 30 monitors means we have a number that works well for us because we can watch everything closely.” She said there are always eyes on every jumper. As to training, “We use a combination of video training and one-on-one training. We shadow our employees during personal training.” Attendance at Fly High is up. “It’s due to advertising, word of mouth, and simply the fact that more people are getting to know about us. Winter is the best season for us, and our numbers increase seasonally as well.”